Carolyn Adams at Conversations With Writers on September 24th

Please join us for a conversation with Carolyn Adams. Carolyn is a poet, artist and performer, her poetry, photography, and collage art have been published in numerous journals, including Willawaw Journal, Caveat Lector, Skylark ReviewHawaii Pacific Review, and Forge Journal, among others. She is author of four chapbooks, Beautiful Strangers (Lily Press), What Do You See? (Right Hand Pointing Press), An Ocean of Names (Red Shoe Press), and The Things You’ve Left Behind (Red Shoe Press). She has been nominated for a Pushcart prize, as well as for Sundress Publications’ Best of the Net Anthology. In 2013, she was a finalist for the post of Houston Poet Laureate. Having recently relocated from Houston, TX, she now resides in Beaverton, OR. Conversations With Writers meet the last Monday of each month from 7-9pm at the Reedville Presbyterian Church at 2785 SW 209th Ave, Aloha.Adams

Coleman Stevenson at Conversations With Writers on August 27th

This month in Conversation With Writers wonderful poet, artist and writer Coleman Stevenson will expand our creativity. Her most recent book, Breakfast, was described as:
Aug“Coleman Stevenson’s Breakfast will jolt you awake, buzzing and crackling with a febrile, plain-spoken intensity, scouring the world for correspondences that signal a truth.”

—John Beer, author, Lucinda, & The Wasteland and Other Poems

In addition to writing, Coleman has been a guest curator for various gallery spaces in the Portland, Oregon, area, and has also taught poetry, design theory, and cultural studies at a number of different institutions there. She currently teaches for Portland Literary Arts’ Delve Seminars and for the Independent Publishing Resource Center where designed the Image+Text track in their Certificate Program. She creates tarot cards and other divination tools through her business, The Dark Exact.

Join us on August 27th from 7-9pm at the Reedville Presbyterian Church at 2785 SW 209th Ave, Aloha. If you have any writing on this topic you would like to share with the group please bring it along!

Dear Stranger : Connecting Oregonians, one letter at a time

From our good friends at Oregon Humanities

Greetings-from-Oregon

Dear Stranger, a letter-exchange project that connects Oregonians from different parts of the state through the mail, strives to create a little understanding across the vastness of this place. For this year’s edition of Dear Stranger, we’re asking people from all over the state to consider some of the questions at the heart of Bridging Oregon, our ongoing cross-community conversation series.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Write a letter. Address it “Dear Stranger.” Write about the place where you live or a community where you feel at home. What makes it unique or unusual? Is there anything about your place or your community that you feel is misunderstood by people outside of it? What might help people understand it better? Fill a page or two, or more if you feel inspired. If you’d like, feel free to include a photo or a drawing or a recipe—anything that will fit in an envelope.
  2. Print and sign the Dear Stranger release form. We cannot exchange letters without a signed release.
  3. Mail your letter and signed release form to Dear Stranger c/o Oregon Humanities, 921 SW Washington St., #150, Portland, Oregon 97205

When you write to Dear Stranger, your letter will be swapped with that of another writer from elsewhere in the state. They will get your letter; you will get theirs. The exchange is anonymous, and you can share as little or as much information about yourself as you like. Please keep in mind that photos, even ones without people in them, may contain information that could be used to identify you.

Dear Stranger is open to everyone, though writers under the age of 18 must have parental consent to participate. (Click here to download the consent form.) Letters are paired at random, though we do our best to match participants with someone outside of their ZIP code. Oregon Humanities staff read all letters before they are exchanged.

Letters will be mailed to participants on a rolling basis beginning in August 2018. Letters will be mailed at the end of each month. We will continue exchanging letters received through October 26, 2018. Instructions for replying to your stranger will be included in your letter.

If you have questions about Dear Stranger, contact Ben Waterhouse at b.waterhouse@oregonhumanities.org or (503) 241-0543, ext. 122.

Bag&Baggage Arts & Culture Series: Independent Authors

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Bag&Baggage is proud to present a new arts and culture discussion series! B&B A&C will bring together diverse artists from a range of cultural industries to discuss their work, their challenges, and their influences. B&B A&C is free to the public!

Our first installment is “Independent Authors,” and will feature four local authors who have made a career self-publishing their work. The first event will include short readings from the author’s works followed by a discussion and Q&A session about the independent author and publishing industry. If you’ve ever wondered if you could write and sell your own books, this is a great introduction to the industry with special insights from local writers and editors who are making the magic happen!

When? September 6th at 6pm

Where? The Vault Theater & Event Space at 350 E. Main St., Hillsboro

Learn more here!

Confirmed Authors:

Brian C Palmer, reading from New Shoes, an urban fantasy series set in Portland

B.C. Palmer lives just outside Portland, OR with his husband Scott and his incredible wonder-dog Mac–the first dog to receive a Ph.D. in particle physics (just act impressed, please, Mac is very sensitive.)

Emerging from the shady underworld of ghostwriting (not nearly as magical as Ghost Writer made it look) and category romance, B.C. is now focused on his debut urban fantasy series, Saint-Moreno (which is very magical). He has plans for an epic fantasy-space-opera series and other unexpected rule-breaking series. “The top guiding principle in my fiction is this: be unconventional. I know the rules and followed them for a long time. Now I want to break them with precision.” -B.C. Palmer

Tonya Macalino, author of The Shades of Venice thrillers for adults, and The Gates of Aurora series for children, reading from Spectre of Intentionand Into The Hare Wood

Tonya Macalino lives in that space Between—where the crossroads of past and present tease the senses, taunts the almost-memory. Haunted by story, she seeks it in the shadows of the landscapes of history and in the blinding glare of what-may-come, both alone and with her family of children’s book authors: Raymond, Damien, & Heléna Macalino. For adults, Tonya’s national award-winning supernatural thrillers, THE SPECTRE OF INTENTION and THE SHADES OF VENICE series, combine the mythic surrealism of Pan’s Labyrinth with the thrill ride that is Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. For children, Tonya’s highly acclaimed urban fantasy adventures, THE GATES OF AURONA series, remind readers of the magical family secrets from Spiderwick Chronicles as well the legendary call to heroism of Chronicles of Narnia and the Dark Is Rising.

Catherine Fredricks, reading from her recent Jane Austen-inspired fan novel, The Dissonance of Desire

Catherine Fredericks lives in the misty forests of the Pacific Northwest with her husband, two children, an impossibly gregarious golden retriever, and a kitten who moonlights as an alarm clock.

Ms. Fredericks has been writing poetry since she was seven years old and still thought poetry had to rhyme. At the age of 12, she borrowed Pride and Prejudice from her school library and, after staying up all night to read it, became a lifelong Jane Austen fan. After attending Portland State University, she went to work in the legal system for a number of years before a happy combination of fate, friendship, wine, and a sprinkling of dogged encouragement from her mother resulted in her brazenly charging forth into the choppy, salty, and conspicuously warm waters of self-publishing.

Marie Robinson, reading from the first novel in her Magical Kingdomseries, Stone and Fire

Brianne (Marie Robinson)  is someone who always wanted to be an author when she grew up and she took a really long route to get there. Over the last ten years, she went from retail to baking, to corporate, to interning at an imprint of a Big 5 publisher, to briefly a literary agent, and finally to an editor and author. Along the way, she picked up a couple different college degrees, a husband, two dogs, and last year, a son. She’s edited independently published books that have hit the top 150 on Amazon and featured by USA Today and hopes to hit those achievements with her own series one day. Her newest series is the Magical Kingdoms series, a reverse harem fantasy romance. Book one, Stone and Fire, was published on August 24, 2018.

July 5th Writers Forum with Deborah Kennedy

Narrating the News Cycle

Current events come to us as prepackaged drama. They have all the stuff of good fiction: memorable characters, high stakes, rich settings. The plot is there and so is the conflict. It’s no wonder, then, that so many writers choose to make use of current events in their short stories in novels. There are clear advantages to writing about real-life scenarios and just as obvious pitfalls. Deborah Kennedy has written several stories based on current events and will share her advice on how to go about crafting compelling fiction that, while inspired by the headlines, goes far beyond the surface story to uncover deeper truths.

D. Kennedy

Deborah E. Kennedy is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Her writing has appeared in Salon, Sou’wester, Third Coast Magazine, and The North American Review. She also holds a Master’s in Fiction Writing and English literature from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She lives in Forest Grove. Tornado Weather is her debut.

 

 

Club de lectura y escritura creativa en Hillsboro (Español)

Spanish-language writers – here’s a write-in for you! This is a fabulous opportunity that’s very much needed in Washington County. Please pass the word: June 7th at 6pm at Insomnia, Downtown Hillsboro location.

En este lado de la frontera el día se me va en inglés. A veces en spanglish. A veces en mute. Hay días en los que siento que me he ido desvaneciendo poco a poco. Partículas y expresiones que se me quedaron olvidadas en la mudanza y que se me siguen yendo cada día que pasa. Este grupo surge pues a manera de muro contención, de placebo, de grito de auxilio.

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Pensado para todos los latinos que habitan este lado y que necesiten letras en español. Pongo en la mesa la siguiente propuesta: dividir las sesiones en dos diferentes discusiones, la primera enfocada en la lectura correspondiente y la otra en la lectura de los trabajos generados por los participantes. La mayoría de las lecturas que se proponen se encuentran ya en el mundo virtual, por lo que no será necesario comprar o generar copias. En las ocasiones en las que sí se necesite el PDF, se proporcionará el enlace para comprar dicha obra.

No se necesita tener experiencia previa. Se recomienda enérgicamente asistir a las sesiones con una pluma, un cuaderno y notas sobre la lectura acordada.

Sin costo, gratuito, solamente por las ganas de reunirse

Por el momento no hay lugar fijo, pero este es el meetup con el horario y lugar de las reuniones http://meetu.ps/c/3VLJh/tHz1H/f

Club de lectura y escritura creativa en Hillsboro (Español)

Hillsboro, OR
3 Miembros

En este lado de la frontera el día se me va en inglés. A veces en spanglish. A veces en mute. Hay días en los que siento que me he ido desvaneciendo poco a poco. Partículas y …

Next Meetup

Primera reunión del grupo.

Thursday, Jun 7, 2018, 6:00 PM
2 Attending

Check out this Meetup Group →

 

Introducing “Hearth,” a back-page, first-person essay for Oregon writers

Hello, Writers! I’m happy repost this from Emily Grosvenor’s blog. Emily was our presenter last September and will return September 2018!

Introducing “Hearth,” a back-page, first-person essay for Oregon writers. Bring your deep relationship to home, a love for everything about nesting, and a funny, thoughtful voice to this new Oregon Home magazine essay section.

In a way, nearly every story is a search for home. A protagonist is forced out of a humdrum, lost existence onto a journey where she must grow and change, seek out great mentors, encounter obstacles, and arrive at that point of contentment, or at the very least, transcendence that comes after the greatest battle of all.

But for many of us, this search for home takes on a physical shape. It resides in how we occupy spaces in the world, in the story we tell ourselves about our lives through our physical homes, whether they be in a city apartment, country farmhouse, filigreed Victorian, or classic Craftsman.

For two decades, Oregon Home magazine has sought to tell stories about how Oregonians build their lives at home.

Make no mistake.

This is no frivolous undertaking.

The history of Oregon has always been about how humans connect to the landscape, envision a life here and then build it.

The search for home is an idea deeply engrained in life here, and that search is something we recognize for what it is: For many of us, creating a home life is nothing less than the greatest work of art we will ever produce.

As a lover of classic first-person form, I want to hear these stories from the people who experience them, which is why, as the editor oOregon Home, I am introducing a classic back-page essay column called “Hearth.”

Think about it this way. Turn off the TV and you’ll remember what the hearth is: The place where we gather to tell the stories that create the meaning in our lives.

I will be answering questions you may have here about this new part of the magazine in the comments. Our first “Hearth” essay, a piece on an obsession with antique lighting by novelist Heather Sharfeddin, will appear in our spring 2018 issue, appearing in early March. I will post more of what I pick here to give you all a better idea of the space as it emerges.

Thank you for reading, and writing!

What I’m looking for:

Length: 750-850 words, payment is $.50/word
Tone: 
Authentic, personal, funny/sad, thoughtful
Style: Voice-driven, first-person, short memoir or essay
Topics: Prescient but timeless. As in, these essays have a contemporary feel and might mention ideas or trends that are interesting to homeowners now, but they retain a timeless connection to that yearning for home. They feature physical homes as opposed to cities, landscapes or regions.
Writers: Who live in Oregon.

What I’m not looking for:
– Stories where nothing is gained or lost or learned
– Stories where homeowners take on something gross (we want readers to turn to this page first!)
– Stories that feel too general, something everybody everywhere has experienced.
– Stories about “This is how I ended up in Oregon.”
– Previously published stories
– Essay pitches. These just don’t work. With essays, you have to read the full thing before you have any idea whether it fits.
– Writing by writers that don’t live in Oregon (sorry!).

How to contact Emily:

The best way to reach me is by writing editor@oregonhomemagazine.com. I respond to every email. If you do not hear back within a week, please ping me again to remind me. Thank you for sending your work my way!

June 7th Writers Forum with Margaret Pinard

Making Stories Come Alive

If you’ve been in the author business for any amount of time, you know that readings and signings can be pretty blah. But if we’re going to the trouble of putting together an event, we want to make it worth our time, right? Margaret Pinard has planned her own three launches and attended numerous festivals and events. She will outline important factors and planning decisions to consider as we brainstorm about how to make our book events special, memorable, and profitable. Think color, think unique locations, think party themes!

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Margaret is a soul from the 19th century who finds it easiest to disguise herself by drinking tea, writing historical fiction, and popping off to the British Isles for ‘research.’
Her favorite books transport the reader to a different time and place, while poking at the unconscious assumptions one holds about one’s place in the world.
Margaret has published two standalone historical novels and two novels in her Remnants series. The third book is due out in 2019. Visit her at http://www.margaretpinard.com.

May 3rd Writers Forum with Carolyn O’Doherty

Every story needs a world in which to take place, whether it’s a suburban kitchen or an imaginary kingdom. In this workshop we’ll talk about the difference between world and setting, how to build a compelling, believable world, and how to seamlessly incorporate world building into your narrative without the dreaded info dump. Bring your favorite writing implement so we can try an exercise (or two!). I’ll also send you home with some additional exercises to apply to your own work.

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Carolyn O’Doherty lives in a much prettier and less dangerous version of Portland than the characters in her new novel, REWIND. When, as a kid, she dreamed up the idea of freezing time, she only considered the benefits: always having the perfect snappy come-back, the right answer on the test, untraceable revenge. It was when she turned the idea into a novel that she delved into the dark side of this potential blessing. Carolyn has an MFA in Creative Writing from Stonecoast. REWIND was released on April 10th.

Washington County Writers hosts a Writers Forum on the first Thursday of each month except January. Join us at Insomnia Coffee’s downtown location at 317 E Main Street in Hillsboro from 7-8:30pm. Admission is $5.

April 5th Writers Forum with CB Bernard

Routine, Ritual, and John Cheever’s Underwear: Unpacking the Habits of a Writing Life

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Like any job, writing takes discipline—which means developing and committing to routines. But it’s also an art, which sometimes calls for less-pragmatic rituals. What can we learn from the practices and prayers of those who embraced the madness of the writing life before us?

C.B. Bernard is the author of Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now, a Publishers Weekly and National Geographic Top 10 Pick and finalist for the Oregon Book Award in nonfiction. His fiction and essays have appeared in Catapult, Gray’s Sporting Journal, Bear Deluxe, and elsewhere, and the Utne Reader has excerpted his work. He’s a frequent lecturer at literary festivals and conferences and a former newspaper and magazine journalist, advertising copywriter, and communications specialist. His new book is a novel set in rural Oregon.

Washington County Writers hosts a Writers Forum on the first Thursday of each month except January. Join us at Insomnia Coffee’s downtown location at 317 E Main Street in Hillsboro from 7-8:30pm. Admission is $5.